Rock and Wood

UNDERSTANDING THE STONE JARGON

Jamie RobinsComment
 Cholla Limestone - £55m

Cholla Limestone - £55m

The distressed faces of tumbled or antique-effect tiles immediately create a traditional, country-style look, and these Cholla limestone tiles are hand finished for the perfect lived-in feel. Mixing natural materials is a key look for interiors, and here the stone floor is paired with wood furniture for a relaxed scheme. 

Granite is available in a wide spectrum of colours, often with mineral specks or subtle veining. It comes in different finishes, but it is the polished form that fully reveals the colours and patterns.

Slate is easily split into thin sections for a textured finish, which works well in wet areas. Colours range from blue and purple shades through to grey and olive green, and they often include rusty red markings. Interestingly, marble starts its life as limestone, but under certain conditions its components crystallise to form veins. In its purest form, it can be found in a wide range of other shades, from various greys through to green and black.

Limestone comes in many tones, from nearly white to the more common warm honey, as well as rarer grey moroccan limestones and dark browns. Textures range from even-grained stones through to smoother types with fossils and coarser, open-textured varieties. Some can be polished to resemble marble.

Understanding the jargon...

  • Honed – a smooth, matt surface for a natural look
  • Tumbled – an aged or distressed finish created by the tumbling process, which uses a machine with water and stones to give softer edges
  • Riven – stone, usually slate, is split to expose the natural texture for a rustic look
  • Brushed – a finish that is created by stiff bristles for a slightly rough appearance
  • Hammered – the surface has been finished with a pocked effect
  • Pillowed – a description used for stone that has soft, rounded edges
  • Polished – smoothed for a glossy finish
  • Flamed – a textured, non-reflective surface produced by a flame; sometimes referred to as a thermal finish